NATURE OF EXTRA COURSES FOLLOWED BY SRI LANKAN STATE UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATES OTHER THAN THE DEGREE: WITH REGARD TO THEIR MONTHLY FAMILY INCOME

Midigama Liyanage Sudarshana

Abstract


The Job market is highly competitive in the modern world. Undergraduates should find the correct path to gain correct knowledge and skills necessary to overcome future career challenges. Extra courses are very useful to them to get ready for future challenges. Even though many good job opportunities are available locally and internationally, many of our graduates do not have required skills to take advantage of such opportunities. The population here was the undergraduates of Sri Lankan state universities. Three Faculties from three universities were selected for data collection. The objectives of the study were to identify the type of extra courses and to inquire into the nature of extra courses followed by the undergraduates according to their Faculties and monthly family income and finally, to reveal the factors that affected them to follow the extra course/s. A majority of the undergraduates who follow the extra courses belong to middle income families. Commerce and accountancy extra courses were popular among the Engineering and Management Faculty students. Language courses were popular among the Arts Faculty students. The Monthly family income of the students was not a significant factor that affected them to follow or not to follow an extra course. A future career was the major reason for undergraduates to follow an extra course. The major reason as to why one should not follow an extra course was lack of awareness of appropriate extra courses. Awareness programs for undergraduates are to be organized by the career guidance unit with regard to the importance of extra courses.  And students are to be provided with the necessary information and direction with regard to the appropriate extra courses for their future career.


Keywords


Extra Courses; State University; Undergraduates; Family Income

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References


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